Skip to main content
Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthKnowledge Exchange
Go Search
  

Mental Health Promotion 

Mental health promotion is defined by the World Health Organization as the creation of living conditions and environments that support mental health and allow people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. Mental health promotion can be effectively addressed in primary care and other clinical settings. This section includes theory and background documents, best practice guidelines and papers exploring broader upstream efforts.

Key links 

Health Promotion

  • Culture Counts: A Roadmap to Health Promotion / PDF
    Canada now has over 200 ethnic groups, yet many in those groups are missing out on the benefits of health promotion. This guide aims to change that by helping you to create effective health promotion initiatives with ethnocultural communities that move towards the goal of ensuring that everyone has an equal opportunity to enjoy good health.
    Please note: The PDF document is the current 2012 version of this resource. The online text content will be updated as soon as possible.

  • Mental Health Promotion in Ontario: A Call to Action
    Evidence has demonstrated that the three most significant determinants of mental health are social inclusion, freedom from discrimination and violence, and access to economic resources. This collaborative paper calls the Ontario government to collective action to address these factors and explicitly promote the mental health of its citizens. It outlines a framework and recommendations for next steps in taking action to promote positive mental health in Ontario. Mental Health Promotion in Ontario is a collaboration between CAMH and partners CMHA Ontario, Health Nexus, the University of Toronto Centre for Health Promotion, and the Ontario Public Health Association.

  • Best Practice guidelines for mental health promotion programs: Children and Youth
    This web resource for health and social service workers provides current, evidence-based approaches to applying mental health promotion interventions and principles. The guidelines are intended to support practitioners in incorporating best practice approaches to mental health promotion interventions directed toward children (7–12 years of age) and youth (13–19 years of age). This resource is a partnership between CAMH, Toronto Public Health and the University of Toronto Centre for Health Promotion.

  • Best practice guidelines for mental health promotion programs: Older adults 55+

    This web resource is the second in a series of guides to promoting positive mental health across the lifespan. It provides health and social service providers (“practitioners”) with current evidence-based approaches in the application of mental health promotion concepts and principles for older adults and is intended to support practitioners, caregivers and others involved in developing programs in incorporating best practice approaches to mental health promotion initiatives that are directed towards older people (55 years of age and over).
    This resource is also available in French (PDF only).

  • Best practice guidelines for mental health promotion programs: Refugees
    This web resource is the third in a series of guides to promoting positive mental health. It provides health and social service providers (“practitioners”) with current evidence-based approaches in the application of mental health promotion concepts and principles for refugees.  It is intended to support practitioners and others involved in developing programs in incorporating best practice approaches to mental health promotion initiatives that are directed towards refugees. The series of guides to promoting positive mental health was developed in a partnership between CAMH, the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, and Toronto Public Health.

  • Focus Page: Workplace Mental Health - a collection of links to resources about workplace mental health and well-being.

  • Health Nexus (formerly the Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse) works towards reducing health inequities and improving the health of communities through collective action and innovation. Health Nexus provides programs, services and resources to help organizations develop and implement prevention and health promotion strategies aimed at enhancing well-being and reducing demand on the health care and social service systems.

See CAMH public policy documents for how CAMH is influencing public policy including CAMH submissions.

Bookmark and Share