Skip to main content
Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthKnowledge Exchange
Go Search
  

Working with women 

CAMH material related to women

Women and trauma

Lori Haskell (2003) describes diagnostic criteria and formal trauma assessment techniques in Chapter 6 of First Stage Trauma Treatment: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working with Women.

Bridging Responses: A front-line worker’s guide to supporting women who have post-traumatic stress is a CAMH guide written by Lori Haskell for front line workers who do not treat trauma themselves but who often need to identify and refer women who may benefit from trauma treatment or who want to know what to do if a woman discloses a history of abuse.

CAMH’s brochure Women: What Do These Signs Have in Common? helps women recognize that current challenges such as depression, sleep disturbances, relationship challenges, anxiety and/or substance use can be signs of untreated trauma responses.

First Stage Trauma Treatment: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working with Women, written by Lori Haskell and published by CAMH, describes the three-stage trauma treatment approach often suggested for addressing complex PTSD or for people who have experienced childhood abuse. An excerpt from First Stage Trauma Treatment describing the phased approach can be accessed here.

Current models for treating substance use and treating trauma suggest that they should be treated simultaneously. For an overview, see “Treating Problem Substance Use and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Concurrently”, by Pamela Stewart, chapter 16 from the CAMH publication Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Sally Gose and Linda Jennings provide an example of the Seeking Safety model’s use in “Seeking Safety: Integrating Substance Use Programming at a Sexual Assault Centre”, chapter 31 from Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Young women speak about sexual abuse in Hear Me, Understand Me, Support Me: What Young Women Want You to Know about Depression.

Eva Saphir’s chapter “Trauma Work with Latin-American Women in Canada” is chapter 14 in the CAMH book Working with Immigrant Women: Issues and Strategies for Mental Health Professionals.

Women and smoking

Gail Malmo’s chapter “Addressing Tobacco Dependency in Women’s Substance Use Treatment” is chapter 25 from Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Women and disordered eating

Sherry Stewart and Catrina Brown’s chapter “The Relationship between Disordered Eating and Substance Use Problems among Women: A Critical Review” chapter 13 from Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Sherry Stewart and Catrina Brown’s chapter “Challenges in Understanding the Co-prevalence of Disordered Eating and Substance Use Problems and in Responding with Integrated Services: A Critical Review” chapter 29 from Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Lorraine Greaves et al research highlight “Smoking and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Girls” from Highs & Lows: Canadian Perspectives on Women and Substance Use.

Pregnancy and lactation

Exposure to Psychotropic Medications and Other Substances during Pregnancy and Lactation: A Handbook for Health Care Providers is a convenient source of evidence-based information and recommendations on these and many other questions for primary care physicians, psychiatrists, pharmacists, obstetricians, midwives, public health nurses and nurse practitioners.

Working with young women

CAMH’s Girls Talk Program provides a safe place for young women to connect with each other and to learn about depression and its contributing factors. Young women develop self-awareness, coping strategies and critical thinking skills through artistic and recreational activities. Guidance in implementing this program can be found on line in the Girls Talk Program: Facilitator’s Manual

CAMH’s Hear Me, Understand Me, Support Me explores the diverse challenges that young women experience in relation to depression: prevention strategies, healthy helping relationships, the dos and don’ts of working with young women, and referrals and resources that can provide more information.

Web links and e-list on women’s mental health and addictions 

Subscribe to CAMH’s email list for updates on research, media articles, new publications and events regarding women's mental health and/or addictions issues

·        To join this women’s interest email list, send an email to: julia_greenbaum@camh.net

You can also access a searchable list of annotated book marks which link to key reports and dependable websites for women's mental health and addiction information. This list is updated continuously. Below is a sample of recent additions:

Retrieving Data
Bookmark and Share